This is one of my favorite tucked-away towns in the country. After stopping here on my way between Seattle and Vancouver, it’s easy to see why this would be a must-stop for touring musicians of all kinds. Although you might think its quaintness works against it, small-town Washington state has long harbored thriving bastions of DIY creativity since the 1970s. With a few local independent labels and a local music publication called What’s Up! Magazine, this tiny town is worth visiting, to make some great connections and play for an awesome crowd! Bonus trivia: It’s where Death Cab for Cutie originated from.

And for a bonus, because it’s not strictly designed for musicians, Google Analytics is worth checking out if you’re obsessed with learning more about the fans who visit your website. This platform is designed to help businesses (if you sell music, then you’re a business) better understand and serve their customers, and that makes it perfect for you.

Born in Cambridge, England, Judith Weir’s musical path has been a very British one. Having studied with Sir John Taverner at an early age and later at King’s College Cambridge, Weir’s music proudly takes inspiration from British medieval history and the traditional folk arts of her parents’ homeland of Scotland. Another star-studded member of this list, Weir won an Ivor Novello Award in 2015 and a year earlier was appointed the first female Master of the Queen’s Music, a position which she currently holds for ten years, succeeding Sir Peter Maxwell Davis. True to her traditional roots and interests, Weir’s music has strong roots in British choral music, yet her output also includes eight operas, many orchestral works, chamber pieces, and solo instrumental pieces. If you’re after something modern and yet deeply rooted in tradition, I highly recommend the work of Dame Judith Weir.

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You may already be familiar with the process of mixing. If you’re reading this article, then it’s likely you are at least aware that live performances use sound mixing boards to balance out the volume levels, panning, and EQ of each instrument and microphone line to ensure the performance sounds properly balanced. You may also be familiar with studio-based mixing practices, which incorporates what I just mentioned, but also includes effects processing like reverb, chorus, delay, saturation, and auto-tune, which can be applied to individual tracks or the mix at large.

Planning ahead by clearing your schedule so that you can manage your time and responsibilities may sound obvious, but if you don’t make a conscious effort it can make a huge difference. Sometimes you just have to set that time aside and say “No.” Whether it’s a social function you have to miss out on or whether you’ve taken on too much work, planning ahead to give yourself ample focus and stress-free windows is one of the most essential things you can do to optimize your working time management.

We usually expect the energy to be at peak level in the chorus, but the matter of what “peak level” actually means is open for debate. In most cases, the chorus or drop sections will be the loudest parts of the song, but there are some producers out there who play with our emotions every now and then, and delay that ultimate satisfaction. You might want to go with the approach of creating a very busy pre-chorus that can potentially lead to an even busier chorus, but then leave listeners with a minimalist, stripped-down chorus which somehow counterintuitively hits really hard.

Student-Artist: Chris Bassaline

As we’re sure you’ve heard countless times over the last several years, the chances of making a living solely off of streaming income are slim to none. But does that mean that making your music available on streaming services is pointless? Far from it.

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If you have been writing songs for some time and find yourself feeling creatively stifled, consider listening to your older songs for inspiration. Map out those songs and identify elements or themes that you can expand upon, improve, or alter. If you are new to songwriting or don’t have music that you previously released, take a trip down memory lane and listen to music that you enjoyed two, five, or even ten years ago. Identify the elements of those songs that you enjoyed and try to incorporate those ideas into your own writing.

Now that I’m an adult and a professional touring artist myself, I wanted to look back at some quotes from my personal favorite artists whose work I grew up on to see if they still resonated with me. Here are seven that I thought were particularly inspiring.

To find out which note is in Fret 8 on the 3rd string, we need to route it back to the same note an octave below on the 5th string. In order to do so, we move two frets back and skip one string (follow the green arrow). The resulting note is in Fret 6 on the 5th string, so D#/E♭. 

Nicholas Rubright is the founder and editor at Dozmia and the lead guitarist for the band Days Gone By. He has a passion for playing the guitar, writing new songs, and creating awesome blog posts like this one.

Let’s talk about some of the basic aspects of a band’s visual aesthetic and hopefully this will inspire and motivate you to take a closer look at the image your band is giving off, and hone it into a style that will get people excited to check you out.